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Common Ways to Sustain a Traumatic Brain Injury

Posted by on Jun 8, 2017 in Medical, Personal Injury | 0 comments

The brain is one of the most important parts of the body, so it is not hard to believe that a traumatic brain injury can significantly change the life of a victim. He is lucky if the injury is mild, but if it is severe, he may experience serious cognitive, motor, and sensory problems.

According to the website of Mazin & Associates, PC, those who have sustained brain injuries may have legal options. This is particularly true for the victims who have sustained them because of the fault of another party, especially if negligence or recklessness has been involved. But how can such an injury be sustained? There are different ways how.

Closed Head Injury

The most obvious way to sustain a traumatic brain injury is by receiving enough traumatic force into the head. Usually, this force comes from falling accidents, traffic accidents, sports and recreational accidents, and violence. These accidents typically don’t involve skull penetration.

Open Head Injury

Like a closed head injury, an open head injury is sustained by receiving enough force. The difference is that open head injury primarily involves skull penetration, usually from bullets, flying debris from car accidents, and other projectiles.

Acceleration-Deceleration Injury

When the body is moving and suddenly decelerates or stops, the parts inside the body goes in a jolting motion that often causes injury. The brain is particularly vulnerable to this motion because of its gelatinous consistency, not to mention that it is enclosed in a hard casing in the form of the skull. Unlike closed and open head injury, an acceleration-deceleration injury does not necessarily require the head to be hit, because the jolting motion alone, if it is strong enough, can already cause damage.

Explosion Injury

This is perhaps the least obvious way to sustain a traumatic brain injury, because it doesn’t involve a blatant hit in the head and it doesn’t happen every day, unlike car accidents. The blast wave may cause injury to the brain. The victim may also get thrown onto a hard surface or get hit by a projectile from the blast. Either can also cause a traumatic brain injury.

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Transvaginal Mesh Complications

Posted by on Mar 9, 2017 in Medical | 0 comments

Transvaginal Mesh Complications

A transvaginal mesh is a surgical mesh used to treat pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence, which are conditions that can be sustained after childbirth, menopause, or a hysterectomy. The term transvaginal refers to the process of how the mesh has been inserted, and it is through the vagina.

A transvaginal mesh obviously has good intentions, but there are instances where it actually causes more damage than treatment. Patients are known to get complications because of the mesh, and it transvaginal mesh lawsuits are not out of the question. There are even legal professionals out there that specialize in them, like Williams Kherkher. The fact that the issue is getting the attention of medical and legal professionals alike is enough reason to fairly say that it is serious.

Erosion

One of the complications patients can sustain is mesh erosion. Mesh can wear through soft internal tissues, break into pieces and cut the vagina, bladder, and bowels, or shrink and cause pain and damage to surrounding tissues. Symptoms of erosion include bleeding, pain in the surgical area, pain during sex or urination, and poking sensations near the affected area. Mesh erosion treatments generally involve the extraction of the entire mesh or all of its parts if it has broken down into pieces.

Infection

A transvaginal mesh has a net-like structure, so there are a lot of tiny spaces where bacteria can develop and hide. The bacteria can even form a film in the mesh, allowing them to colonize and live there for months and even years. This may result into abscesses or collections of pus that has built up in bodily tissues.
Organ Perforation

The mesh can also perforate or puncture organs as it breaks or erodes. The most vulnerable organs are the bladder, rectum, and urethra. Perforation can lead to infections, and there are instances where they can also cause further complications. One such complication is a septic shock, which occurs when the mesh punctures organs and cause urine and waste leakage to the bloodstream.

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